Professor Mom

Chronicles the life of a mom, teacher, and writer trying to stay sane amid the chaos of daily life.

AddThis

Comments

mouse's picture mouse

Makes me really glad that we only purchase chicken that's labeled antibiotic-free (that and organic are, by definition, not arsenic-containing, per one of the articles you linked). But argh! I had no idea.

It would be interesting to have our own chickens, but I don't see an easy way to keep our dog out of them--if our town even allowed them (and Trillian almost certainly wouldn't).


Aliki McElreath's picture Aliki McElreath

I suspect a lot of consumers don't know about the arsenic-feed issue. I think it's really only a huge concern if you eat a lot of chicken; but children are so affected by toxins--imagine a small child eating chicken only 2-3 times/week and you can bet the roxarsone could be a concern. I hadn't thought about run-off, either, as a huge concern--contamination of water supplies from chicken waste containing arsenic has become a problem in some areas.

Scott needs some convincing, too. L. and I have already picked out the two hens we want from his catalog...:)


Sweet Pea Chef's picture Sweet Pea Chef

Well said.

Our babysitter's next door neighbor has a small coop, which the boys love, love, love to visit. And you are right, it takes very little space.

Thanks for sharing the additional information about commercially produced chicken.


Aliki McElreath's picture Aliki McElreath

Thanks! I was really taken with how many kids were on the coop tour, and how many were so overjoyed by the whole thing!


Aliki McElreath's picture Aliki McElreath

I've heard the same thing--that the eggs are amazing! I remember eating fresh eggs in Greece, when I was a child (they were still warm, even!) and I do remember thinking they were really good.